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< BackState of American Energy 2016

The State of American Energy 2016 highlights how energy choices made at the federal level directly affect the lives and livelihoods of families and communities at the local level. And it underscores the need for a national energy policy discussion that is focused on what’s most important: American jobs, growing the economy, making our nation more energy secure and strengthening our nation’s global energy leadership.

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Explore by Region

East

Energy Opportunity

Thanks to safe, modern hydraulic fracturing and technologically advanced horizontal drilling – much of it occurring in the prolific Marcellus and Utica shale plays in the East – the United States has become the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas, launching an American energy revolution that has fundamentally changed the world energy order.

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79%

support increased production of U.S. oil and natural gas resources

65%

oppose higher taxes that could decrease energy production

78%

support increased development of the country’s energy infrastructure

76%

oppose legislation that could increase the cost of oil and natural gas operations

Pennsylvania

Over 300,000 Pennsylvania jobs are supported by the oil and natural gas industry.

New Hampshire

The ban on crude oil exports is expected to cost the New Hampshire economy up to $130 million per year by 2020.

Rhode Island

Natural gas fueled 95% of Rhode Island’s net electricity generation in 2014.

Delaware

Oil and natural gas development could create $2.4 billion in new investment in Delaware.

Southeast

Untapped Energy Potential

Multiple studies confirm significant economic benefits are waiting to be unlocked along with energy resources in the coastal Southeast. To realize the full advantages of these resources and maintain global energy leadership, expanding offshore oil and natural gas development is essential.

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87%

agree increased access could help strengthen energy security

77%

support increased production of U.S. oil and natural gas resources

64%

support offshore drilling for oil and natural gas

88%

agree that increased access could help create jobs

Florida

Crude exports could add up to 10,736 jobs and $1.23 billion to Florida’s economy in 2020.

Georgia

349 Georgia businesses are part of the oil and natural gas supply chain.

Eastern Gulf of Mexico

Development in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico could produce nearly 1 million barrels of oil equivalent per day and contribute over $18 billion per year to the U.S. economy.

Atlantic Coast

2014 estimates from the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) reveal that 4.72 billion barrels of technically recoverable oil and 37.51 trillion cubic feet of technically recoverable natural gas could be awaiting discovery off the Atlantic Coast.

Gulf Coast

Fueling America

The Gulf Coast region is poised to expand its crucial role as an export hub. Long staples of America’s oil and natural gas production, Gulf States could soon be at the center of a new era in American energy leadership.

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81%

believe U.S. government regulations can contribute to increased costs for gasoline to consumers

74%

are concerned about government requirements for higher ethanol blends

79%

support offshore drilling for oil and natural gas

68%

support exporting natural gas and oil to our allies

Louisiana

In 2014, the Louisiana government netted $1.2 billion in revenue from oil and gas operations in the state.

Alabama

“Many agree that lifting this ban will give the United States economy substantial benefits including increased energy production and investment, public revenue, and traded and energy security.” Sen Richard Shelby (R)

Regional Fact

The U.S. refining industry supports over 1.2 million jobs for highly skilled American workers.

Regional Fact

New refinery sector emission rules finalized in 2015 could cost refiners up to $1 billion to implement.

Pacific

Energy Policy Hits Home

Energy opportunities abound in Pacific Coast states. Yet state and local policies often prevent advantages of the American energy resurgence from reaching West Coast residents. Pacific states can welcome major economic benefits by harnessing energy development opportunities.

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65%

are concerned about government requirements for higher ethanol blends

67%

oppose higher taxes that could decrease energy production

79%

believe U.S. government regulations can contribute to increased costs for gasoline to consumers

80%

agree that increased access could help create jobs

California

California could realize over $1 billion in state economic gains and add 10,000+ jobs in 2020 from crude exports.

California

Despite promising reserves offshore and in the Monterey shale formation, California oil production dropped 27% since 2001.

Regional Fact

Ethanol production has diverted nearly 40% of of the U.S. corn crop from food to fuel, leading to a 25% increase in the consumer price index for food since 2005.

Regional Fact

The top five most expensive gas markets in 2015 were all Western states (Alaska, California, Nevada, Hawaii, and Washington).

Arctic

Energy Security

Alaska is home to some of the largest oil and natural gas reserves in the United States. The world’s largest remaining conventional, undiscovered oil and natural gas reserves – estimated at 13% recoverable oil and 30% of recoverable natural gas resources – await development in the Arctic.

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91%

support increased development of the country’s energy infrastructure

84%

agree increased access could help strengthen energy security

82%

support increased production of U.S. oil and natural gas resources

90%

agree that increased access could help create jobs

Alaska

Oil and natural gas development is the backbone of Alaska’s economy – supporting 1/3 of all state jobs and contributing more than $6 billion in labor income.

Alaska

61% of Alaska’s land is controlled by the federal government, which has erected one obstacle after another to energy development.

Alaska

An estimated 30% of the nation’s known recoverable offshore resources are in Alaska’s waters.

Alaska

Alaska oil and natural gas production has been a lifeline for the U.S. energy supply, offsetting much of the mid-1980s production declines experienced in the Lower 48 and transporting 17 billion barrels of oil through the Trans-Alaska Pipeline south to the Pacific coast.

Mountain West

Environmental Leadership

The Mountain West’s energy producers are at the forefront of efforts to safely and responsibly deliver the energy our nation needs all while shrinking the footprint and environmental impact of energy development operations. Today’s energy development occurs on a much smaller “footprint,” generates less waste, and is less disruptive and more compatible with the environment.

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74%

oppose legislation that could increase the cost of oil and natural gas operations

69%

oppose higher taxes that could decrease energy production

75%

believe U.S. government regulations can contribute to increased costs for gasoline

83%

support increased production of U.S. oil and natural gas

Nevada

The average upstream employee’s salary in Nevada is $74,348 – almost $31,000 more than the average annual salary across all industries and sectors.

Montana

“Eastern Montana’s oil fields are leading the way to better American energy security, more Montana jobs and a stronger economy.” — Sen. Jon Tester (D)

Regional Fact

In 2014, Mountain West states produced more oil than Oman and more natural gas the Norway or Saudi Arabia – if the Mountain West was a sovereign nation, it would’ve ranked 6th in the world in natural gas production.

Wyoming

“Too often, the discussion is ‘Do you want energy or the environment.’ We have to reject that question. We need, and should expect, both.” – Gov. Matt Meade

Central

Building a Secure Energy Future

Energy production in states like Texas, North Dakota and others is generating a beneficial economic wave. The rapid growth of U.S. energy in recent years is also directing attention to infrastructure challenges facing the Central states. Additional pipelines are needed to handle the surge in domestic oil and natural gas production, a lot of it occurring in the Central states.

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76%

oppose legislation that could increase the cost of oil and natural gas operations

82%

support increased development of the country’s energy infrastructure

74%

are concerned about government requirements for higher ethanol blends

66%

oppose higher taxes that could decrease energy production

Texas

6 states in the Central U.S. (plus Texas) are among the top 20 crude oil producers.

Iowa

“[KXL] was a chance to help meet the country’s energy needs and reduce dependence on less reliable foreign sources.” – Sen. Charles Grassley

Texas

Texas climbed from ~1 million bpd in 2007 to ~3.1 million bpd thanks today, largely due to hydraulic fracturing.

Regional Fact

Pipelines safely deliver 99.999% of crude oil and petroleum products to their destinations every year.

State of American Energy 2016

Job Creation, Energy Security, Global Leadership

State of American Energy 2016 highlights how energy choices made at the federal level directly affect the lives and livelihoods of families and communities at the local level. And it underscores the need for a national energy policy discussion that is focused on what’s most important: American jobs, growing the economy, making our nation more energy secure and strengthening our nation’s global energy leadership.

To get a sense of the reach and scope of the industry, each chapter of this report examines the distinctive policy challenges and opportunities through highlights of these issues in seven regions that include all 50 states. The report makes clear that the economic benefits and opportunities provided by the oil and natural gas industry aren’t confined to energy producing states and that the industry could do more with the right energy policies based on market principles and sound science.

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